Tuesday, February 28, 2006

Using Marketing PR to Promote Your Business

Author: Michelle Payne-Gale

Public Relations is an important marketing tool, and should be considered carefully. It is a way of connecting with your customers, suppliers and distributors. The objectives of Marketing PR are to build awareness, raise your profile and build credibility, and encourage your staff. Here are five Marketing PR methods that you can use to promote your company.

News

It will be your responsibility to develop a concept for a story about your business, to research it fully and to write a press release (if you are not confident in your writing ability, consider passing this task to a copywriter). There needs to be a good relationship between your company, and the editors of your chosen publications. Unless you are trained in Public Relations, it may be wise to seek the services of a PR professional at this point. PR professionals are in the best position for encouraging the media to attend your press conferences and accept your editorials. They understand the needs of editors and reporters, and as a result will be able to sell you appropriately to them.

Publications

There are a number of different types of publication that fall under the umbrella of PR, and can be used separately or in conjunction with each other. Brochures advise customers about the product, its uses, how it works, its benefits, and any extra features. Newsletters and magazines help the build up the company’s image, convey news and special offers, as well as marketing the company in a variety of ways. Articles in local newspapers help to advertise and draw attention to the company and its products. Multimedia methods are the most expensive of the publications, but have the greatest impact. Many companies choose to create videos about themselves and their products, and use them for presentation purposes. Blogs and the Internet are the cheapest of the publications, and have the greatest coverage, without needing a large budget.

Events

These include seminars, conferences, exhibitions and sponsored events, such as sports or charity. They give an opportunity to advertise your expertise in your field and display all that your company has to offer. Sponsoring events puts you in front of potential clients and can help you to get contacts via networking.

Public Speaking

Give speeches at trade association meetings and clubs. Consider speaking at or hosting a networking event for business professionals or customers. If your company is larger in scale, consider holding speaking events with media professionals. If public speaking is not your thing, consider using the services of a public speaking coach or speechwriter to help build your confidence.

Community Activities

Much the same as sponsoring events, consider contributing money and time to good causes. Remember that it is better to give than to receive, and it will be a great way of marketing yourself at the same time.

When you consider using Marketing PR, ensure that you are clear on your marketing objectives, your messages, your audience, your PR methods, and take care to implement them appropriately. Keep track of your results, to ensure continued success in the future.

About the author: Michelle Payne-Gale is the owner of Essence (Business & Admin Support Services), specialising in virtual administration, marketing, web design, research & creative support for start-ups and small businesses. Additional articles are available at: http//www.essence-services.co.uk.

She is also involved in the development of http//www.stay-in-antigua.com, a tourism information website for the Caribbean island of Antigua.

Is it News? A Manufacturing PR Checklist

Author: Thomas Cutler

Ranked as the nation’s leading manufacturing journalist and an editor, TR Cutler (www.trcutlerinc.com) has issued a PR Checklist for manufacturers. Cutler tells the extraordinary stories of manufacturers. According to Cutler, “There are great companies making great products. There are too many manufacturers and companies serving the manufacturing sector that have simply neglected to tell their story. My goal is to tell these stories in an interesting, dynamic, understandable, and relevant way. My goal is to provide a checklist for manufacturers to determine what is and is not newsworthy.”

Newsworthy Manufacturing Checklist The following Checklist should be reviewed weekly to determine the events and circumstances that might merit Media Coverage. I. New or Updated Product Information II. New Customer Information III. New Strategic Alliances/Partnership Information a. Software Vendors (ERP, CRM, SCM) b. Professional Services (Law Firms, CPA’s, PR firms) c. Co-op Bundling Sales Program IV. New Facility or Manufacturing Operation V. Company Data Announcements a. Sales Data (Increased sales) b. Growth Announcements (by employees, sq. ft., revenue) c. Marketshare Announcements VI. Industry Sector News a. Competitive Analysis b. Comparison within the sector c. Leadership Position within the sector VII. Local/Regional News a. Jobs/Local Economic Impact b. Community Service/Goodwill c. Sponsorships/Participation VIII. Events, tradeshows, conferences, awards IX. Association/Organization Memberships a. Manufacturing Association b. Industrial Sector Association partnership c. Other key Organizations/Association d. Political Affiliation X. Cross-Reference Media a. Radio b. Television c. Photo Opportunity

Cutler’s check list is used in conjunction with the proprietary Manufacturing Media Consortium of 2000 journalists writing about trends and data in the manufacturing sector.

TR Cutler 954-486-7562 www.trcutlerinc.com e-mail protected from spam bots

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About the author: None

Is PR Right for You? 6 Questions to Ask

Author: Michele Pariza Wacek

When most people think about marketing, they think advertising. While advertising is a part of marketing, marketing is much bigger than advertising. There are lots of different marketing methods floating around out there, and the challenge as a business owner is figuring out when it's appropriate to use each one and the best way to use it.

Public relations, or PR, is the art of getting someone else to write or talk about you or your business. Preferably in a favorable manner. Traditionally, ""someone else"" was the media. In this day and age however, someone else can also be a blogger, a freelance writer, an e-zine publisher or even an owner of a big Web site. For purposes of this article, I'm using the word ""media"" to refer to all of those folks.

PR is also being able to get yourself on a big talk show to talk about yourself or your business, or writing your own article that's published in a desired outlet. (Not your own newsletter or Web site.)

PR is one of my favorite marketing methods, but it can also be one of the more frustrating ones. Even when you do everything right, you still might not get the publicity you want. Or for that matter, ANY publicity at all. When a PR campaign doesn't work, you can find yourself wanting to pull out all your hair in frustration.

Even with that in mind, I do believe most if not all businesses can benefit from some type of PR campaign. But before you launch into something that could end with you becoming hairless (and investing in a sizeable hat collection) ask yourself the following questions.

1. Do I need to see results right away? If you do, better pull out your wallet and pay for some advertising. PR takes time. And it's not guaranteed. You might not see your article for weeks, months or ever, and there isn't a darn thing you can do about it. If it's immediate gratification you want, don't look for it in a public relations campaign.

2. Do I have the time to consistently devote to a public relations campaign? We're back to the time issue. PR not only takes time to see results, but you also have to take time to make it happen. Either you have to do it or you have to pay someone else to do it. If you do it yourself, you'll have the potential of garnering the equivalent of thousands of dollars of advertising for little or no money. But it will cost you some time. If you pay someone else, you'll save time (which is a good thing, I'm a big believer in outsourcing) but it can get expensive. Worse yet, you STILL might not get any coverage for your money.

3. Do I have enough perseverance to run a PR campaign? PR is about follow-up. It's about sending story idea after story idea to the same reporter before one finally connects (and maybe it's the tenth one). It's about sending a little note or letter to the same editor for as long as several years before you get a bite. It's about reminding your contacts you're out there until one day they realize they need you.

If you're willing to court the media, develop relationships and do whatever you can to make their lives easier, the rewards can be huge.

4. Do I have newsworthy events happening at my business? (Newsworthy is something media personnel feel would interest their readers.) Or, if I don't, can I create them?

I'm not talking about making things up here. But there are things you can be doing to make your business more newsworthy. For example, you can do a survey and publish the results. You can tie a feature of your product or service to something that's currently happening in the news. You can hold an event. You can research a newly published study that relates to your product or service. There are countless ways you can transform aspects of your business into newsworthy story items -- the creativity exercise below can help you come up with your ideas.

5. Do I want to build my credibility? Develop my status as an expert? Then get that PR campaign off the ground. Nothing builds your credibility or expert status faster than having other people say you know what you're talking about.

6. Do I want to augment my other marketing efforts? Public relations definitely plays nicely with the other marketing methods. You can be building your long-term expert campaign with PR and building short-term customers with advertising. Or you can turn your community relations strategies into PR campaigns. It's a great way to get the most bang out of your marketing time and dollar.

Creativity Exercise -- How can you use PR in your business?

Grab some sheets of paper and pen (I like the fun gel pens myself) and get ready for some brainstorming.

Start by listing everything you do or sell. Then write out all the features or descriptions of your products or services. For instance, if you have a book, what is your book about? What does it offer people?

Now see if you can turn those features into something newsworthy. Is there a time of year when people are interested in your services? (Accounting and tax season). Are there any studies you can dig up? Is there something in the news that ties into your product? Can you turn an aspect of your business into a human interest story? (Something like fitness tips for busy people or parenting tips for single parents, etc.) Write everything down that comes into your head, even if it's silly. See if you can come up with 50 story ideas.

Now look at what you wrote. Can you find a few in there that you think would interest the media? Congratulations -- you just came up with a PR campaign.

About the author: Michele Pariza Wacek is the author of ""Got Ideas? Unleash Your Creativity and Make More Money."" She offers two free e-zines that help subscribers combine their creativity with hard-hitting marketing and copywriting principles to become more successful at attracting new clients, selling products and services and boosting business. She can be reached at http://www.TheArtistSoul.com. Copyright 2005 Michele Pariza Wacek

Article PR headlines - the reader is secondary

Author: Glenn Murray

A great headline can be the difference between having your free reprint article published once (on your own website...) and having it published hundreds, if not thousands, of times all over the Internet.

Sure, the content has to be worthwhile; it has to be helpful, informative, and not just a sales spiel. And there's no denying that a well written article can be very compelling. But if your headline doesn't cut it, the article won't stand a chance. The best article in the world will never see the light of day without an effective headline.

Now, more than ever, article submissions need a good headline. But it's not just the reader you have to worry about. In fact, the reader is secondary! When it comes to article PR headlines, your main focus should be the publisher.

You may think the requirements of a good headline haven't changed over the years, but they have. Unlike headlines for traditional newspapers, magazines, etc., which target only the reader, article PR submission headlines target first the publisher, then the reader.

So how do you write a headline for an online publisher?

Here's a few tips...

1) State your domain

No matter what your business, you can be sure that potential publishers of your article are inundated with information every day. Imagine hypothetical 'Publisher Pete'. He's the webmaster of a high PR site. He receives hundreds of article submissions every day. Additionally, he farms article submission sites (aka 'article banks', 'article submit sites', 'free-reprint sites') for articles on a regular basis. Because so many of the article submissions he sees are spam or unrelated, Publisher Pete is quick to dismiss anything that isn't obviously - and immediately - relevant to his website. So make sure your headline signals the general subject area of the article submission, not just the exact topic.

2) State your argument

Every website has an agenda. Whether it's to sell, persuade, or inform, there's always an angle. When our friend Publisher Pete looks for free reprint content for his website, he wants something that complements his agenda. If he's selling chemical garden fertilizers, he doesn't want an article about the evils of chemical fertilizer. Nor does he want an article espousing the virtues of organic fertilizer. He wants an article promoting the value of chemical garden fertilizer. If that's what your article is about, make sure the headline lets him know.

3) Don't make empty promises

Sensationalized headlines may work in traditional media, but they're not so effective in article PR submissions. Few things frustrate an online publisher more than being lured in by a promising headline which turns out to be nothing more than hot air. For publishers who take the time to carefully filter content before publishing, empty headlines are nothing more than time-wasters. For publishers who are a little less meticulous, empty headlines result in a site which is characterized by disjointed, contradictory, low-quality content. Either way, the publisher isn't impressed, so make sure the headline of your article is relevant to (and validated by) the body of your article.

4) Put yourself in the publisher's shoes

Always think about ways to make the publisher's job easier. It's as simple as that. Brainstorm 5, 10, 20 headlines, then put yourself in the publisher's position and ask which one you'd choose. That's the best headline for your article submission.

5) Think about your publisher's readers

Publishers want articles that readers will open. But remember, your publisher's website may cater to an entirely different type of reader to your website. Whenever you find yourself thinking about your secondary audience (the reader), make sure you're thinking about the publisher's readers - not your own. That settled, you can go on to focus on regular audience-headline considerations such as making the headline attention-getting, targeted, and benefit driven.

Conclusion

With the emergence of article PR as a great way to generate a high search engine ranking, and the associated proliferation of article submission spam, the right headline is more important than ever. The important thing to remember is that you're faced with a gatekeeper, and you need to address their needs first.

By following all the publisher-focused tips above, you'll not only see your article published many more times, you'll also see it published on more relevant websites. This will help both your ranking (because links from relevant sites are always the best) and your click-thru traffic (because the audience will be more relevant).

Happy headlining!

About the author: * Glenn Murray is an SEO copywriter and article submission specialist . He is a director of article PR company Article PR and also of copywriting studio Divine Write .

Manufacturer 2006: The Year of PR About Great U.S. Manufacturers

Author: Thomas Cutler

TR Cutler, Inc. (www.trcutlerinc.com) is the Public Relations firm specializing in PR for the manufacturing community worldwide. In conjunction with a new affinity PR program exclusively offered through manufacturing trade associations, CEO, Thomas R. Cutler, announced the year-long PR program, Manufacturing 2006.

According to Cutler, “We are going to use the full force of Manufacturing Media Consortium™, more than 2000 journalists writing about trends in the manufacturing sector, to tell the stories of thousands of American Manufacturers.” Cutler is considered the nation’s leading manufacturing journalist writing hundreds of feature articles each year and the author of The Manufacturer’s Public Relations and Media Guide. Cutler as is a regular contributing editor dozens of leading manufacturing magazines.

The Manufacturing PR Advantage™ program will profile U.S. manufacturer using 90 day aggressive media outreach strategy. Associations working with TR Cutler, Inc. will receive significant rebates for the fees their members pay to participate in the program.

TR Cutler, Inc. Cutler, who has worked with dozens of manufacturing associations, recognized that membership revenue was not self-sustaining and many local PR firms simply lack the expertise or media relationships in the manufacturing sector. Cutler says, “Everyone wins: the manufacturing association looking to drive additional operating revenue, the manufacturer who wants to see immediate and direct results from an aggressive PR campaign, and TR Cutler, Inc. There is also another “win” – people will learn about the amazing and fantastic manufacturing being done by thousands of American manufacturers.

According to Dean Schmidt, the Affinity Program Manager for TR Cutler, Inc, “The 90-day campaign will drive traffic to a client's website, and increase product and company awareness, and quantify increased sales. Most manufacturers companies have never conducted an aggressive public relations campaign, this program will allow them to get their feet wet using a very affordable methodology."" Manufacturing Associations which have not yet participated in the Manufacturing 2006 Affinity campaign are encouraged to enroll no later than September 1, 2005.

Thomas R. Cutler President & CEO TR Cutler, Inc. www.trcutlerinc.com 954-486-7562/888-902-0300

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About the author: Professional Marketing Firm

Monday, February 27, 2006

Marketing Operations Elevates Communications & PR Pros

Author: Gary Katz

Is your marketing department taking advantage of MOM and MRM? Do you have BAM and DAM systems in place? Do you know how to measure NPV? Do you even know what I'm talking about?

If so, you may not be a ""Quant"" (a marketing scientist or specialist in marketing analytics) but you're certainly ready to seize a leadership role and spur your company into the new world of Marketing Operations.

Marketing Operations (AKA MOM or Marketing Operations Management) seeks to improve performance and measure ROI through sustainable processes, best practices and clearly-defined metrics. Admired technology companies (like Intel, IBM and Adobe) are hiring VP or director-level individuals to refine and fine-tune their marketing organizations to run with an operational focus. Market research firms like Gartner and Forrester are also rolling out new research services with a heavy focus on Marketing Operations. And the first U.S. conference on Marketing Operations was held in New York this past May.

Marketing operations tackles:

(1) measuring the performance of marketing effectiveness; (2) ensuring appropriate marketing organization; (3) deploying marketing processes, tools and infrastructure; (4) managing marketing skill development; and (5) building a sense of community across the marketing discipline.

Why should you care?

For starters, Marketing Operations is a great vehicle for becoming more strategic and less buried in task. It equips you to talk the language that C-level executives appreciate, take control of your destiny and ultimately become more valuable to your organizations. Best of all, you can address head-on the issues that affect you directly and also represent corporate America's biggest challenges, including how to:

• define meaningful success metrics from which performance can be measured (one type of measure, NPV or Net Present Value, calculates the present value of an investment's future net cash flows minus the initial investment); • optimally leverage resources in increasingly thinner marketing departments (MRM or Marketing Resource Management focuses on workflow, role definition, project management, planning, budgeting and other resource allocation strategies); • more effectively manage shared knowledge so insight is retained even after key employees move on, enabling more informed decision-making (knowledge management strategies include BAM or Brand Asset Management, and DAM or Digital Asset Management); and perhaps most importantly • replicate successful marketing programs so marketing best practices are institutionalized (and you aren't).

About the author: Gary M. Katz, APR, is president and CEO of CommPros Group (www.commprosgroup.com), a Santa-Clara, Calif.-based firm that provides marketing operations services to help companies leverage their marketing investment, plus a variety of outsourced marketing program management services to support lean marketing departments.

Manufacturer 2006: The Year Manufacturers Discover PR

Author: Thomas Cutler

TR Cutler, Inc. (www.trcutlerinc.com) is the Public Relations firm specializing in PR for the manufacturing community worldwide. In conjunction with a new affinity PR program exclusively offered through manufacturing trade associations, CEO, Thomas R. Cutler, announced the year-long PR program, Manufacturing 2006. According to Cutler, “We are going to use the full force of Manufacturing Media Consortium™, more than 2000 journalists writing about trends in the manufacturing sector, to tell the stories of thousands of American Manufacturers.” Cutler is considered the nation’s leading manufacturing journalist writing hundreds of feature articles each year and the author of The Manufacturer’s Public Relations and Media Guide. Cutler as is a regular contributing editor dozens of leading manufacturing magazines.

The Manufacturing PR Advantage™ program will profile U.S. manufacturer using 90 day aggressive media outreach strategy. Associations working with TR Cutler, Inc. will receive significant rebates for the fees their members pay to participate in the program. TR Cutler, Inc. Cutler, who has worked with dozens of manufacturing associations, recognized that membership revenue was not self-sustaining and many local PR firms simply lack the expertise or media relationships in the manufacturing sector. Cutler says, “Everyone wins: the manufacturing association looking to drive additional operating revenue, the manufacturer who wants to see immediate and direct results from an aggressive PR campaign, and TR Cutler, Inc. There is also another “win” – people will learn about the amazing and fantastic manufacturing being done by thousands of American manufacturers.

According to Dean Schmidt, the Affinity Program Manager for TR Cutler, Inc, “The 90-day campaign will drive traffic to a client's website, and increase product and company awareness, and quantify increased sales. Most manufacturers companies have never conducted an aggressive public relations campaign, this program will allow them to get their feet wet using a very affordable methodology."" Manufacturing Associations which have not yet participated in the Manufacturing 2006 Affinity campaign are encouraged to enroll no later than September 1, 2005.

Thomas R. Cutler President & CEO TR Cutler, Inc. www.trcutlerinc.com 954-486-7562/888-902-0300

About the author: Professional Marketing Firm

Any PR Is Good PR

Author: Dan Brown

- your press release should sound like news, not an ad

- you should only send your press release to the media related to the topic of your press release - keep your press release one page in length

- your header, contact information and release date should be at the top of your press release - use short sentences and double space in between sentences

- your header and first few sentences should capture the readers attention

- you should tell a story and briefly mention your business, product or service in the body of the press release

- proofread your press release many times. Look for grammar and spelling mistakes. Another reason entrepreneurs ignore promoting their online business with press releases is because they don't know what's newsworthy. Here are 16 online business press release ideas:

- new products or services you're offering on your web site. - the results of an online survey or poll you've completed - a virtual trade show or seminar you're hosting. - a free chat room class you're teaching

- your opening of a new web site

- an online award your business or web site has won

- a free e-mail newsletter you're publishing - new online products or services you're giving away - an online business association or club you're starting - a famous person that's endorsing your business - a major joint venture you're doing with another business - a new book or e-book you wrote - an expert or celebrity who's speaking in your chat room - a fundraising event you're doing at your web site - a new contest or sweepstakes you're having at your site - major sponsorships you're doing online You can get other press release writing tips and ideas by reading other businesses press releases, reading how to publications, talking to experts and visiting other media web sites. I hope this article persuades and helps you to promote your business through press releases.

About the author: Author Dan Brown has been active in internet marketing for the past 4 years. Dan currently is working with the Zabang search engine introducing their new affiliate program which is due out Nov, 2005. http://www.zabangaffiliate.com/

Free Press Release: Submit Press Release Distribution

Author: Dylan

The easiest way to find out what a particular reporter prefers is simply by asking. You can make a phone call and find out for sure what the best method of delivery will be. This also gives you an opportunity to give the person a ""heads up"" that they will be receiving a press release from you.

This isn't the same as following up (which as mentioned earlier, you shouldn't do), and people won't get annoyed so long as you don't start trying to convince them over the phone that your press release is a ""must read.""

Stay professional and be confident that if you have followed the steps outlined above, chances are you will get a positive response.

Quick Tip: Should you decide to send your press release in e-mail format, send it directly in the body of the e-mail. Do not send attachments! Many people won't even bother opening them, and some e-mail programs will delete them automatically.

Should you decide that fax. or snail mail is the best choice, make sure that you use a legible font. There is absolutely no need to use fancy, ornate fonts. A clear and easy-to-read lettering will be best.

And if you are mailing your press release, don't fold the paper like it is a letter. Make sure that the first thing the reporter will see is your heading and headline. This will let them know right away what they are dealing with.

Final Thoughts:

If you find yourself tempted to stray from these basic rules for formatting your press release, take a moment to think about the over-tired, over-worked reporter who will be reading it. Their time is limited, their patience is short, and their garbage can is close at hand.

Press releases can be an extremely powerful marketing tool if:

1) You strategically plan your angle so that it's interesting and unique, 2) Your message is short, sweet, and to the point, and 3) Your formatting adheres to industry standards.

4) To submit your free press release to media contacts - http://www.media-press-release.com

5. Choose a good web hosting - http://www.hostcube.co.uk

If you can successfully combine these three key things, then you'll capture media attention that can easily swing your sales - and public awareness of your business - into high gear.

About the author: 2006 copyright article. ONLINE MEDIA PRESS RELEASE, media contacts at http://www.media-press- release.com , hosting at http://www.hostcube.co.uk

Industrial, Manufacturing, and Distribution Associations to Offer PR Services by TR Cutler, Inc.

Author: Thomas Cutler

Manufacturer neglect, prompted the firm's development and launch of the intensive Manufacturing PR Media Blitz' program, a 90—day program allowing even very small manufacturers to tiptoe into the public relations arena driving quantifiable and measurable impacts.

""Manufacturers spent the past fifteen years becoming lean, efficient, and highly competitive while completely ignoring their marketing and public relations efforts,"" according to Thomas R. Cutler, the nation's leading manufacturing journalist and CEO of TR Cutler, Inc. (www.trcutlerinc.com) based in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.

According to Dean Schmidt, Vice President of the Affinity Program for TR Cutler, Inc., ""We had to find a way for manufacturers to rapidly experience ROI from an aggressive PR campaign. 45 press releases in 90 days generates extraordinary traffic to manufacturers' websites and optimizes search engine rankings."" Schmidt acknowledged that new website traffic from potential customers often helps to quickly identify missing ""call-to-action"" messages and results in revised or updated websites.

Schmidt also noted, ""With almost nine out of ten manufacturers employing less than fifty employees, tight margins, global competitiveness, and enticing spending alternatives, PR is often relegated to the ""back burner.""

Cutler developed the PR Advantage Affinity program for manufacturing associations' members. TR Cutler suggested that, ""Due to our leadership role in the manufacturing public relations arena, we have decided to introduce a program that will allow manufacturing associations to offer their members deeply discounted PR services starting in September 2005. There is no cost for the manufacturing associations to participate in the program and offer these deeply discounted PR services to their members.""

In early Q3, Cutler conducted the largest North American manufacturer survey about anticipated marketing budgets in 2006. Statistically significant findings indicated that nearly two-thirds (64%) of the manufacturers surveyed anticipate a dramatic increase in PR budgets of 50% above 2005 levels; travel, print advertising, tradeshow exhibiting, and direct mail each revealed a 30% decrease in 2006 marketing versus 2005.

TR Cutler 954-486-7562 www.trcutlerinc.com trcutler@trcutlerinc.com

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About the author: Professional Marketing Firm

Sunday, February 26, 2006

Advertising and PR

Author: Matt Bacak

What Is The Difference Between Advertising and PR? Advertising and PR are two different functions, however, many business do not know the difference. Since spending your advertising budget and your PR budget effectively is crucial, how can you expect to accomplish this important goal unless you understand the difference?

When thinking of advertising, billboards, glossy spreads, quarter-page newspaper advertisements and other forms of highly visible promotional material comes to mind. This is clearly advertising. Branding or creating a well-recognized presence for your company is a clear example of effective advertising. Business cards with pizzazz are a form of advertising.

What, then, is PR? Public relations are those things that must be accomplished to let the world know who you are and what your company offers. Press releases, news conferences, professional networking and exhibitions or trade shows are examples of PR work. PR is not as flashy as advertising but it is every bit as important. Effective Advertising and PR In today's competitive marketplace, it is crucial to spend every bit of your advertising and PR budget strategically. Public relations can provide a mix that uses advertising but also enhances the efforts of your advertising dollar.

It has long been a ""supposed fact"" in business that word of mouth is the best advertising. This is not necessarily true. It is an unfortunate fact that a customer who has an exceptional experience dealing with your business will tell one or two people about their experience. A customer who has a bad experience will tell at least a dozen people and your business gets negative advertising.

Word of mouth is, however, one of the most effective PR tools available. Offering school tours, sponsoring science fairs or children's' sports teams, volunteering for public speaking opportunities, attending trade shows or presenting at conferences are rather inexpensive ways to build a wealth of good will and put your name out front.

Have you noticed that television commercials for a product often run a 15 to 30 second advertisement of a really great advertisement and within a few weeks shorten the advertisement to the most important 5 to 10 seconds? The reason is that the initial advertising is meant to brand the product or service and associate the advertisement and the product or service in your mind. It works very well - provided you have really memorable advertisements.

About the author: Matt Bacak became ""#1 Best Selling Author"" in just a few short hours. Recent Entrepreneur Magazine's e-Biz radio show host is turning Authors, Speakers, and Experts into Overnight Success Stories. Discover The Secrets To Unleash The Powerful Promoter In You! Sign up for Matt Bacak's Promoting Tips Ezine ($100 value) just visit his website at http://www.powerfulpromoter.com or http://promotingtips.com

Dean Schmidt Drives Manufacturing Association PR Program

Author: Thomas Cutler

Manufacturer neglect, prompted the development and launch of the intensive Manufacturing PR Media Blitz' program, a 90—day program allowing even very small manufacturers to tiptoe into the public relations arena driving quantifiable and measurable impacts.

""Manufacturers spent the past fifteen years becoming lean, efficient, and highly competitive while completely ignoring their marketing and public relations efforts,"" according to Thomas R. Cutler, the nation's leading manufacturing journalist and CEO of TR Cutler, Inc. (www.trcutlerinc.com) based in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.

According to Dean Schmidt, Vice President of the Affinity Program for TR Cutler, Inc., ""We had to find a way for manufacturers to rapidly experience ROI from an aggressive PR campaign. 45 press releases in 90 days generates extraordinary traffic to manufacturers' websites and optimizes search engine rankings."" Schmidt acknowledged that new website traffic from potential customers often helps to quickly identify missing ""call-to-action"" messages and results in revised or updated websites.

Schmidt also noted, ""With almost nine out of ten manufacturers employing less than fifty employees, tight margins, global competitiveness, and enticing spending alternatives, PR is often relegated to the ""back burner.""

Cutler developed the PR Advantage Affinity program for manufacturing associations' members. TR Cutler suggested that, ""Due to our leadership role in the manufacturing public relations arena, we have decided to introduce a program that will allow manufacturing associations to offer their members deeply discounted PR services starting in September 2005. There is no cost for the manufacturing associations to participate in the program and offer these deeply discounted PR services to their members.""

In early Q3, Cutler conducted the largest North American manufacturer survey about anticipated marketing budgets in 2006. Statistically significant findings indicated that nearly two-thirds (64%) of the manufacturers surveyed anticipate a dramatic increase in PR budgets of 50% above 2005 levels; travel, print advertising, tradeshow exhibiting, and direct mail each revealed a 30% decrease in 2006 marketing versus 2005.

TR Cutler 954-486-7562 www.trcutlerinc.com trcutler@trcutlerinc.com

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About the author: Professional Marketing Firm

Are PR and Marketing Key To Yahoo!'s Future?

Author: YahooSupporter

Is PR and Marketing the Key to Yahoo!'s Future? Today, there is news that Google is ""testing"" its ebay-like auctions and it may soon release an electronic wallet.

Anyone who knows anything about Yahoo! knows that they implemented ebay-like auctions years ago (see http://auctions.yahoo.com), and have had an electronic wallet for years also (see http://wallet.yahoo.com).

Both of these products are FULLY tested, as are all Yahoo! products, by very very experienced software engineers, with excellent software engineering / QA skills, so that bugs are very rarely introduced into the ""live"" system - i.e. Yahoo! customers very rarely find bugs - Yahoo! employees find them first, before the software is made public. The wallet is highly secure and extremely reliable, and the auctions work spectacularly well and it is possible to purchase products often more cheaply than is possible on Ebay. The only fault with the Yahoo! versions of these products is that they have not been marketed fiercely enough - very few web users even know they exist!

Contrast this with Google, which appears to leave most of its products in ""beta"" mode forever, so that when their customers find bugs, they can use the excuse that the reason there are still bugs is because the product is a beta product.

My guess (though I cannot prove this, my experience in the software industry tells me that this is true) is that the real reason is because Google software teams hack together solutions very quickly to meet customer demand and that full software engineering and QA are not something that Google takes as seriously as does Yahoo!

This story is very similar to all the ""new"" products that Google comes up with..

Of course, everyone knows that Yahoo! Search (http://search.yahoo.com) was around long before Google gurgled its first goo. Unlike Google's search (with its so called ""Florida update"", and other accidental and/or catastrophic reorganizations of the search engine ranking criteria), Yahoo! has never upset its SEO audience by keeping its ranking algorithm secret, changing it drastically without warning, or accidentally changing it.. This is because all Yahoo! changes to the search engine (as is the case with all Yahoo! software) undergo Testing and Change Management (basic principles of software engineering that ensures that unexpected changes do not appear on the live web site). For some reason, publicity about Google's severe mistakes in this area rarely hit the news stands and TV news, despite the fact that it cost lots of businesses a great deal of money! Likewise, Yahoo!'s sterling record in search ranking is rarely publicized in contrast to the Google flakiness.

Google Groups was implemented years after Yahoo! Groups (at http://groups.yahoo.com) - Google Groups is still in beta, years after it bought the newsgroups and software running them from Deja (Google has not changed it much since buying the ready made software and content from Deja, and for a long time after they bought it, much of it was read-only, rendering it almost totally useless during that time period).

Google Desktop search came after Yahoo! Desktop search (see http://desktop.yahoo.com) too (and - oh yes - it is still in beta).

Google's shopping search service, Froogle, came a long time after Yahoo! Shopping (see http://shopping.yahoo.com). The Yahoo! product is vastly superior also, with lots of very useful content to aid in shopping decisions, comparison tools, rating and review facilities etc.

Google News came a long time after Yahoo! News (http://news.yahoo.com) and, of course, it is still in beta! And, many would argue, is still inferior in many ways, to the Yahoo! offering - in terms of the diversity of news feeds on offer, the layout, and other factors.

Google Maps came along years after Yahoo! Maps (http://maps.yahoo.com), and is not only still in beta, it is full of little bugs which I, for one, find very annoying! Although there are some nice gimmicks in Google Maps (you can drag maps around), often such gimmicks are not what the user actually wants to do when using a map (I want to double-click and drill down on an area, like I can in Yahoo! Maps!), and other gimmicks, that would be useful, dont work - e.g it is easy to implement maps into other websites thanks to an open programming api - but that api often fails due to programming errors.

Gmail, likewise, has some nice gimmicks (some of which the user may actually want/need) but is full of bugs, is still in beta, and comes years after Yahoo! Mail (http://mail.yahoo.com) was well established. Yet Gmail got huge publicity because Google offered huge amounts of storage space as part of the deal for those signing up to the service (Yahoo! had, for a long time, offered a great amount of free space to its customers, - unlimited storage space on Yahoo! Photos (http://photos.yahoo.com), a 50Mb of free webspace courtesy of Geocities (http://geocities.yahoo.com), various amounts of free storage space for Yahoo! Briefcase (http://briefcase.yahoo.com) users, Yahoo! Notepad (http://notepad.yahoo.com) users and various amounts of space within many other facilities, all of which were fully integrated with Yahoo! Mail (http://mail.yahoo.com), helping users to organize their information more usefully (whereas Google's space is all contained within mail, creating a mass of different types of information all stored in the same application, making it very difficult to organize, search or make use of) - and yet Google publicity suggested it was the first to offer so much free storage space. Maddeningly, in response, Yahoo! simply expanded the amount of free storage space associated directly with Yahoo! Mail accounts and kept quiet about its other offerings, and the benefits of organizing information in the way facilitated by Yahoo! offerings.

Google Toolbar is another idea that Yahoo! (http://toolbar.yahoo.com) had before Google, though it is one of the few Google pieces of software no longer in beta, that actually works and even may occasionally feature one or two gimmicks that Yahoo! should implement in its own toolbar (for example, web ranking is a useful feature for SEOs and webmasters, which Google came up with first)!

The unhappy ""ig"" (Google's personalized home page) is Google's half-hearted attempt at a personalized portal home page like my yahoo! (http://my.yahoo.com) but it is a very very poor attempt, and is a vastly inferior product. Its a shame more Yahoo! users do not realize how powerful my Yahoo! is. Again, a fault with Yahoo! marketing and PR, not with the product itself.

Moreover, I am aware of at least three ""new"" products that Google is about to announce that Yahoo! has had available to the public for a great deal of time..

It is clear that Google has a very strong Marketing and PR machine - it is no coincidence that so many TV shows, movies and adverts feature people ""googling"", that so many news headlines feature Google's name, nor that Google's share price and revenues are going through the roof in comparison to that of Yahoo!

However, PR and Marketing are the ONLY reason for this.

So, what is wrong with the Yahoo! Marketing and PR machine? Why is Yahoo! allowing Google to grab the headlines for inferior copies of products that Yahoo! has had in its arsenal for many years?

Terry Semel, Jerry Yang et al ought to find out the answer to that question.. NOW!

See YahooSupporter's blog http://blog.360.yahoo.com/blog-4sU6UzIocqjUhnPaqIsNgU0-

About the author: I have permission to reproduce this article here on behalf of the mysterious YahooSupporter

Fatal PR Mistakes Authors Make on Their Book Campaigns

Author: Penny C. Sansevieri

Any author who is driving their own PR campaign knows that often times marketing and media can be an uphill battle. Many times authors are pitching and promoting themselves with minimal results. It can be tedious and frustrating and sometimes lead them to make fatal PR mistakes that can cost them their campaign.

One of the first, and potentially most fatal, is thinking that one or two media appearances are going to wing your book into the bestseller spotlight. Media works when it's done consistently and often it takes months, and in some cases years, for you to reach your own ""PR payoff."" The most important part of a campaign is the author's ability to stick with it. Most of the interviews you see nationally on shows like Good Morning America and Oprah, started with a regional buzz. Build your base (or buzz) in your own back yard first and then start getting your message out on a national level. And this leads us to our second PR mistake: ignoring regional or trade media. Sometimes when you're promoting yourself it's easy to get caught up in going after the big fish, but don't ignore the smaller regional and niche publications, they can be a gold mine of PR and really help to get the buzz going.

Next on our list of fatal PR mistakes is the technique with which authors pitch themselves. First and foremost you want to make sure you're pitching the right people, don't just go after a ""producer,"" find the producer that's right for the story. And be cautious of when you pitch, before you start calling the media, turn on your TV or radio and see if there's a breaking news story. There's no quicker way to offend your media target then pitching them a story when they're scrambling to cover a plane crash or some other major disaster.

As you're navigating through your PR campaign you'll also want to make sure your pitches are focused and relevant. It's much easier to get the attention of the media when you're pitching them something that's already on their radar screen. For example remember when you're putting together your campaign to keep an eye out for seasonal or news spins to your topic. If, let's say, you are discussing the topic of depression, you might want to pitch it around a nationally designated ""depression awareness day"" or, perhaps, given all the buzz around college kids and depression, you might want to tackle this as a back-to-school issue. Targeted, focused pitches are the best way to get the media to notice you, so open that calendar or read your local newspaper to find out what's hot and top of mind. Also, respect their time when you're pitching. Get to the point, don't ramble and remember that this is not about you, it's about the benefits to their readers, viewers, or listeners and most of all, never, ever, ever sell your book. You should always sell yourself and your expertise. Producers and editors will be looking for the WIIFM factor behind your pitch (what's in it for me) not how they can showcase your book.

Finally there's no quicker way to end your campaign than to over promise, stretching the truth, or not being reliable. If you miss an interview or over promise on a commitment one time, you can kiss any further media goodbye. Word travels fast in the industry and bad news travels even faster. Remember be patient, be persistent, and be professional and you're bound to get the media you deserve and keep your campaign alive and well!

About the author: Penny C. Sansevieri helps turn authors into success stories. Check out her Virtual Author Tours, free insider info on publishing, and author marketing newsletter at http://www.amarketingexpert.com

TR Cutler, Inc. Manufacturing PR Firm Puts Dean Schmidt in Charge of International Growth

Author: Thomas Cutler

Thomas R. Cutler, who founded the consortium in 1999, has grown the participation from 300 journalists to more than two thousands key clients, journalists, editors, trendsetters, and key business leaders worldwide. Cutler noted that, ""The numerous Free Trade agreements, expansive globalization, and worldwide manufacturing process, has generated huge growth for manufacturers outside North America who want to establish a media and market presence in North America. Dean Schmidt, since joining TR Cutler, Inc. in August 2005 has made a significant and valuable contribution.""

Schmidt noted, ""We have already seen extraordinary growth from manufacturers in New Zealand, Australia, South America, and Europe. With the expansion of the Manufacturing Media Consortium in the international markets, we expect revenues to double by 2007.""

Vice-President of Operations for TR Cutler, Inc., Dean Schmidt is now responsible for the international growth and development of the manufacturing public relations organization. Schmidt will perform a critical liaison function between freelance journalists, editors, and publisher and manage the day-to-day operation of the highly successful division.

Cutler has authored more than 1000 articles for a wide range of manufacturing periodicals, industrial publications, and business journals including most of the leading monthly trade publications. TR Cutler, Inc., (www.trcutlerinc.com), is the nation's largest manufacturing marketing and public relations firm, based in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

TR Cutler, Inc. www.trcutlerinc.com Thomas Cutler 954-486-7562

About the author: None

Saturday, February 25, 2006

Writing a Powerful E-mail Press Release

Author: John Karnish

Press Releases are a great source of publicity for your business and often attract more buyers than traditional, paid advertising. However a lot of people are confused when it comes to sending out publicity releases, so here are some things you should know.

You should always remember that the main objective is to seek publicity for your business. You never should send out a sales letter. That's not what a release is for and you'll never get published. Always target the person to whom you send your release. Sending out releases isn't a numbers game. The more targeted a contact is to your release, the more likely they will publish it.

Once you find a media source that would be interested in your publicity release, then you want to find which editor is the best for your purpose. Don't send it to a managing editor, you want to send it to a contact that is related to your release.

When you send a release, always personalize it. ""Dear Editor's name,"". Use their title, ""Being the Sports Editor for..."" Also use their field of interest if it's known. ""Being the Sports Editor for the (New England Chronicle) and an avid soccer fan...""

There are two, general ways of sending out a press release by e-mail. Both have good and bad qualities. Some editors prefer that you send them a short e-mail, ""briefly"" describing your release and asking permission to send it. This will prevent an editor from asking to be removed, which would end any future contact with him.

The second way is to make absolutely sure he would be interested in your release and just send it out. The advantage of going this way is neither of you is wasting time by asking permission and granting it. It's up to you. I suggest you try and see how each one works for you and choose the better of the two. Whichever strategy you use always honor an editor's request to be ""removed.""

Try to keep you release short; e-mail releases are recommended to be only three paragraphs. Many editors will receive a hundred or more releases a day, so you have to get his attention in a very short amount of time.

Catch their attention in the first paragraph, the main focus of your release in the second and your contact information in the third.

You don't want to give your whole story in the press release, you want them to contact your for more information. The nice thing about the internet is that you can make this information directly available by using a webpage or an autoresponder.

List all of the information they'd be interested in. Think of some questions that an editor would probably ask you in an interview and provide the answers. Write down all of the specifics of your story. You might want to list your credentials or company history too. Whenever you list a contact number, always leave a number where you can be reached. Editors don't have a lot of time and they're not going to go out of their way to get in touch with you.

When thinking of ideas for a release, one good way of getting noticed is by tying yourself in with recent news stories. Another idea is just to make a bold claim, ""that you can live up to."" You'll find that lots of people will give you publicity, to try to prove you wrong. For example ""New York stock broker say he can make anyone a millionaire."" Just remember that you should be able to stand behind your claims.

Format of a Press Release

""FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE"" should be written in top, left corner. If your information needs to be printed on or before a certain date, you would write something like: ""FOR RELEASE AFTER MARCH 27"" or ""FOR RELEASE BEFORE CHRISTMAS."" These would also go in the upper, left-hand corner.

Skip two lines and type ""CONTACT:"" Then list your contact information. Skip two lines and type your headline. Make sure your spend some time here because this is what will determine if your release gets read or shred. (=

The first paragraph begins with the dateline. Here's an example: (New York, NY - October 9, 2000) - Then. skip a space after the dash and write your first sentence. The first paragraph of your release should be a few sentences that concisely summarize the content without much specific detail. Remember to answer the basic questions who, what, where, when, why and how. Pay special attention to the first paragraph because it's here that you have to convince the editor that your release is worth reading and printing. Be sure to make this clear. Why should her readers be interested? How will it affect their life? What are the benefits?

The second paragraph, you want to go into a little more detail and add some quotes. Remember to establish yourself as an expert. Don't say ""Tom Jones says,"" say ""Tom Jones, webmaster for Kidco.com and prominent author says...""

In the third paragraph, you want to persuade the editor to seek more information. You can have them visit your web site or a pre-made webpage, send a message to an autoresponder, call you etc. At the end of your press release, you want to skip a space and end with three, centered number signs. ""###""

About the author: John Karnish of the Internet Marketing Professional website. Visit his site for a QUICK And EASY Way To Build A Profitable Business On The Internet. Start Today! Visit: http://internet-marketingpro.com

A Great Press Release Can Really Get Your Business Noticed

Author: Alvin Apple

Getting a new business off the ground is a daunting prospect. There are so many things to consider: office space, equipment, personnel, and the all important advertising. Money is always tight in the beginning, and quite often by the time that last dollar is spent getting things up and running, the advertising budget just isn't there. Not to worry. There are many great ways of getting the word out about your business without spending a fortune. In particular, press releases have long been an effective way of letting the public know that your business exists.

Now a press release is not an ad, and any press release structured like an ad will be deleted in a second. The job of a press release is simply to alert the media to something newsworthy about your business. It's a bit like fishing. Whether or not the editor takes your bait depends on how you present your business, or even what kind of day the editor is having. In the end, it is entirely up to the individual editors whether or not they use your story.

When writing your press release, make it sound newsy. Don't start off with sales language. You can save the blatant commercial stuff for the end of the release. Choose something interesting about your business and create a headline. ""New Innovations in Gardening Produce Beautiful Crop of Strawberries,"" is much more likely to be read than, ""Johnson's Nursery Grand Opening Special: 50% off on Strawberries."" Get the picture?

After you've got a great headline, fill out your story with interesting facts about your business. Give a brief history of what led you to what you're doing now. Mention how the needs of the market are changing and how your business is a result of those changes. Try using quotes. Whatever you do, make it interesting, and stay away from blatant sales language or specific offers.

Once you've got your release written, submit it to as many media outlets as possible. You can find media databases and lists of editors all over the web. One that I've had particularly great luck with is Gebbie.com., try them, and also do a search to see what you can come up with on your own. Submit to all of your local papers, radio stations and TV stations as well. Too often people doing business online forget about local media, and sometimes they can be your biggest champions.

Linking your release to a popular story in the news can also get an editor's attention. If a specific topic is already on the tips of people's tongues, a related release is much more likely to be picked up. Media people tend to think that a typical audience can only stay interested in a few topics at a time, so if you can tie your story in to something that's already getting buzz you'll have a much better chance. If you don't get picked up right away, keep trying. What an editor ignores today may sound like a great story next month. Don't give up.

The time at which you submit your release is crucial as well. You will always have a better chance of being noticed if the editor receives your story before 3pm. Late afternoon is deadline ""crunch"" time for newspapers, past the prime news times of radio, and getting into last minute preparation time for TV news. Keep that in mind and don't get lost in the shuffle.

If you do it right, submitting a press release can be a great way of getting the word out about your business. There's money to be made out there if you just know how to do it.

About the author: Alvin Apple helps everyday people start businesses they will enjoy. Then he teaches them how to succeed. Read all his helpful strategies, including his latest article ""How to Use Signature Files to Give Your E-mail The Personal Touch That SELLS,"" at http://AlvinApple.com Reach Alvin at 801-328-9006 or alvin@drnunley.com.

Secret To Using Press Release To Generate Huge Traffic

Author: Daegan Smith

Are you getting ready to introduce a new service or product? Have you used or are you familiar with press releases? An interesting and newsworthy press release can create a lot of search visibility, media exposure and web site traffic.

People are more interested to narrative news than an advertisement. Through a press release, you can get your story successfully published. Doing a story regarding your website as well as products that is offered and having it published by the media is equivalent to getting an endorsement. Most significantly, giving off a press release is so much cheaper compared to buying an ad.

A press release is a narrative news regarding your business which you will distribute or submit to several media including the internet. Keep in mind that it will not sound as an advertisement. Each time that you offer a new product, a service or anything new that is taking place in your website, you can write a press release about it.

This can be distributed by way of a service such as prweb.com or Press-Release-Writing.com and this can be viewed by thousands of individuals in just weeks as well as be picked up or chosen by several web sites for publication.

An effective press release would need you to describe your website with the viewpoint and assessment of news. Deal with the curiosity of your targeted readers and give emphasis on why customers should look and read your story.

Guidelines in writing your press release:

1. Inverted pyramid lay-out. This format places not so important data and facts down in your release, permitting you to revise your story more easily to fit the available space that you have. If you have to cut short your story, you can start leaving out certain details beginning at the lowermost portion of the story then working upwards.

2. Be exact to the point. Your release must be well defined; this can be stated in your title. Concentrate on the main concept of your story; ask what, where, why and when to help you focus your story.

3. Create a clever title. A catchy title is an effective way to attract attention.

4. Limit your content length. Keep it with an average of 350 to 500 words. The shorter your release, the better; too much explanation and reasoning in a very small room will decrease your storyís efficiency.

5. Format your story in block, with no indentation on paragraphs.

6. Re-examine your story, making certain that it will not appear to be an essay; it must be educational yet appealing.

7. Proofread. Check and double check your story. Read it aloud to yourself and walk away for a while so that you can come back on it and examine it with a clear mind and fresh eyes.

What to write in your press release:

1. Use brief sentences and the lines should be double spaced.

2. Create an attention grabbing header.

3. Refer to and state your product, business or service in your story.

4. Write a press release when you have new products to offer.

5. Make a press release regarding the outcome of online poll or surveys that you have just completed.

6. When you are hosting a seminar or trade show, you can write a press release about it.

7. Make a press release when you are opening a new web site.

8. When your business has achieved an online award, create an informative story about it.

9. When you are publishing a free e-zine, it is good reason for a press release.

10. When you are offering or giving away free products, let your customers know through a press release.

After writing your press release, do the following:

1. Send your press release. There are many online press release distribution sources (some free and others charge a fee) that you can send your press release to. Be resourceful and search the internet to find the best one for you.

One is 24-7PressRelease.com offers free press release submission and distribution service providing customers with the choice to donate finances for a much higher detection, placement and recognition.

2. Wait. Check with the media and make sure your release is appearing on a certain that it is planned or scheduled. If it does appear in the newspaper, clip it and place it on your site; Newspaper clippings can also represent an endorsement.

3. Look how your traffic go sky high! Seat back and watch a big flow in your web siteís traffic.

Press releases are worth trying and pursuing, as long as one does it right. Take it into consideration and act on it, then success will not be far behind.

About the author: Daegan Smith the owner of Net MLM Articles and the leader of the fastest growing team of successful home business enterpernuers on the net. Find out how we're creating financial freedom all across the globe and how to get in on the action FREE => http://www.comlev.com

Friday, February 24, 2006

Create A Press Release

Author: Jean Melconian

A press release is a great way to get free publicity for your site. In order to obtain editorial coverage for your business you must find a particular idea that is unique to your business and it should be newsworthy.. A press release is a document (usually between 500 to 1,000 words) about your company designed to make a newsworthy announcement to the media. A press release is a key tool for public relations professionals. This type of document has a highly defined style and format, and in a nut shell answers the basic questions of those who might be interested in the particular subject- who, what, where, when, and why. Using traditional PR efforts to reach both online and other media outlets in order to obtain free editorial coverage is a powerful way to reach potential customers. Press releases can be distributed to the media (such as newspapers, magazines, radio news outlets, television news outlets, and online publications) via U.S. Mail, fax or e-mail. Once you have a press release announcing your business (or some other news worthy event relating to your business), your goal is to get it in the hands of the editors. To help you compile your own customized media list, consider visiting the Web sites sponsored by Editor & Publisher (http://www.medianinfo.com), Media Online Yellow Pages (www.webcom.com), or the National Press Club (npc.press.org). Broadcast Interview Source (www.yearbooknews.com,) publishes a variety of phone numbers, addresses, fax numbers and e-mail addresses of writers, reporters, producers, editors, and radio elevision hosts. The Gebbie Press's All In One Directory (www.gebbieinc.com) lists contacts of 23,000 people from TV and radio stations, newspapers, African American and Hispanic Media, news syndicates, networks, and AP/UPI bureaus. Other media directories published by: Bacon's Media Directories (www.baconsinfo.com) Burelle's Media Directories (www.burrelles.com). In an article by John Hewitt (www.azstarnet.com) , before sending out any press release make sure you: 1.Know who to send it to, not just where. Find out who the editor or reporter is for the section you want your release to appear in. 2. Only send the release to one person per news outlet. Any problems that develop from duplicate coverage and effort will be blamed on you. 3.Don't just send press releases- call the editor or writer directly. If you want your release covered, call the person before sending the release, and a couple of days later to make sure they received it. Just don't become a pest. 4.Know your deadlines. Magazines, even weekly ones, are often planned months in advance. Seasonal events, such as Christmas and Easter, are a great example of this For calendar items, know the news outlet's deadline for the section. 5. Keep it short and informative. Reporters and editors are notoriously busy. Most press releases should be kept to one page. Two is acceptable. If they want more information, they'll ask. 6.Write in a news style. That means putting the prime information (who, where, what and when) into the lead (first paragraph). It also means keeping the sales pitch subtle. No exclamation points!!! Many papers will directly reprint a press release, as long as it is written in a professional news style. Use short words and sentences. Make sure what you're saying is very clear. 7.Always include, at the top corner of every page, a two- or three-word description of the story, the name and phone number of key contact people (no more than two), the page number ( if there us more than one page) and the release date (usually ""For Immediate Release""; otherwise "" Please hold until xx/xx/xx""). 8.End a press release with ### typed across the center margin a couple lines below the end of your text. If a release is continued on another page, type- ""-more-"" at the bottom of the page in the center. 9.Use standard 8 ½"" x 11"" paper typed on one side only. Never break a paragraph across two pages. Leave plenty of margins for editors to write notes-an inch and a half all around should be fine. 10.Bright Idea; Whenever you distribute a press release, also post the release somewhere on your Web site, under the heading ""Corporate Information,"" ""Company Background,"" or ""Press Releases.""

About the author: Jean Melconian is the owner of WebTrans International, Inc., International trade resources and logistics are available at: http://www.webcargo.net.

NEWS OR SNOOZE: Will Your Press Release be a Doosie or a Dud?

Author: Meredith Pond

A press release can be an effective weapon in the fight for media and public attention. In fact, many businesspeople don't even think twice before writing or ordering a press release, correctly assuming that a release can provide the necessary publicity to boost sales.

As much as a well-written press release can do for your image, you need to be sure that your business or product is appropriate for a release. Believe it or not, a press release that isn't truly newsworthy can easily end up sounding like a sales pitch, which can do irreparable damage to your company's image.

A press release should make an announcement about a new product or service, an event, or a change in the way a product or service is marketed. If your company has changed management, released or upgraded a product, or is staging an important event, you have material for a solid release.

Also, any little-known business or service can make a good release if it serves the needs of the public in an interesting way. For example, I just wrote a release for a gentleman who provides a service that allows homeowners to pay off their mortgages years sooner, without making larger payments or refinancing their current loans. With mortgage rates falling and the real estate market picking up, that kind of material made a very good release.

So, a story that surrounds current events and peaks public interest usually makes good release material. Now, let's talk about what doesn't.

If your business is, for example, an MLM that hundreds of other people are taking part in and marketing on their own, chances are that the media has already heard about it and won't pick up your story. I'm not saying that MLMs are automatic losers in the media department, because a brand-new or extremely unique program may still be newsworthy. In most cases, however, people trying to market an MLM should rely mainly on classified ads or informative articles that dance around their business, then reveal the contact information at the end.

Similarly, if you belong to an affiliate program along with lots of other people who are using their own marketing techniques, a press release probably isn't the way to go. Media people are extremely busy, and easily get overrun with press releases. Again, in this situation a classified ad or well-written article is probably a better use of your time and money.

A clever writer can take almost any subject and turn it into a press release without sounding like a sales letter. As great a talent as that is, however, media professionals will easily see through it. An effective press release doesn't just SOUND newsworthy, it IS newsworthy. A sales letter in disguise does not make a good release.

Above all, keep in mind that the last thing an editor wants to read is a sales pitch; sending them this kind of material will only get you blackballed in the media. If you're not sure your material is appropriate for a press release, ask an expert. Before ordering your release from an outside source, for example, call them or send them an email, tell them about your business, and ask them if they think a release is the right tool for you. If it's not, chances are they can recommend something that will serve you better.

About the author: Meredith Pond is editor and manager of DrNunley's http://CheapWriting.com. She has written hundreds of successful press releases. See her complete publicity and copy writing packages for students, businesses, and entrepreneurs. Reach Meredith at meredith@drnunley.com or 801-328-9006.

Write a Power Press Release and Get a Feature Story-Seven Times as Valuable as Advertising

Author: Judy Cullins

Do you send out press releases? Have they brought you financial rewards? If not, you may want to rethink how to write a good one-one that editors pay attention to. If editors noticeand love your press release, they will want to interview you for a feature story. The feature story not only gets you valuable attention, it also brings credibility to you, your products, and your services. It is seven times more valuable than advertising.

For example, in a large city daily newspaper, your feature story can get editorial space worth anywhere from $1500 to over $5000 in ""free advertising."" This space is worth seven times as much as an ad because it implies the newspaper endorses you.

You have only seven seconds to impress, so be sure your news release has an outrageous heading that includes a benefit. Then, be able to prove it. What do you think of these? ""Design Every Part of Your Book as a Selling Tool,"" ""Double, even Triple your Online Sales Through Outrageous Headlines,"" from which I created this one my Web site: ""Double, even Quadruple your Web Sales Through Opt-in Ezines""

Market Yourself Through the Media Interview

Always ask the interviewer is there any problem with mentioning your phone number or Web site address. What good is a feature if your audience can't get in touch with you? They usually say yes.

The San Diego Union-Tribune responded to my press release with the headline ""Seven Sure-Fire Ways to Sell More Books Than You Ever Dreamed Of"" by giving me space that would have cost $3000 if I had placed an ad. Funny, they didn't even interview me.

The columnist created her own story.She used this heading: ""Workshop Guides Novice Book Authors."" One of her highlights said, ""seminar participants might be the next John Grisham.""

My phone rang off the hook for over a week. I hired an assistant and we took over 100 calls and collected over 60-email address. To each of the latter I sent my monthly eNewsletter ""The Book Coach Says..."" and got four new book-coaching clients worth thousands of dollars over the next six months. At the same time, my assistants sold 25 books and kits at the back of the room.

You Have What Editors Need

Media editors and radio/TB talk show producers want and need human interest, and newsworthy stories. You have what they need-solutions to problems their particular audiences have.

About the author: Judy Cullins: author, publisher, book coach _Ten Non-techie Ways to Market Your Book Online_ _Write Your eBook or Other Short Book-Fast!_ http://www.bookcoaching.com/teleclasses.shtml Subscribe to FREE ezine ""The Book Coach Says..."" Email: Judy@bookcoaching.com 619/466-0622

How to Write a Press Release

Author: Kirk Gordon

Why You Should Write Press Releases: A press release is another way of saying news release or an announcement. It’s an easy and affordable way to get your message out to the public. It allows you to announce new products, services or improvements your company has made.

Other common reasons for writing press releases includes, but not limited to, generating more revenues, obtaining new customers and branding your business. Every business strive to make their company’s name a household name, and submitting press releases is a great way to do so.

With the emergence of the internet businesses now have an easy way to submit their press releases to thousands of journalists and news papers world-wide, with the click of a mouse. Press release distribution services are becoming increasingly popular for both web-based and real-world based businesses.

How to Effectively Write a Press Release: As I stated earlier, a press release is simply another name for “news” release. The first thing you must consider is weather you have “news” worthy information to announce. Journalists and editors are seeking interesting news that people want to know about.

Good press releases will generally answer who, what, where, when & why. A press release is often written in third person, and generally includes quotes form a company representative or customers where applicable. If a news editor thinks your submission is newsworthy, he or she will publish your release. However, if you fail to provide any essential information or your submission is not newsworthy, an editor will quickly move your news release to the bottom of the pile.

Editors and Journalists receives plenty of news releases each day. The easier you make it for them, the easier it becomes for your news release to be published. Think of it as “Your helping them” to “help you.”

Formatting Your Press Release A press release will include the Headline, Summary, and Body. For example, lets say you own a greenhouse business and you recently acquired hydroponics equipment to grow vegetables and herbs. You also will grow plants using organic nutrients or fertilizers. Below is an example press release for a business of this nature. You may follow the structure of the example, but written in your own words to reflect your business.

Headline: A concise, catchy, understandable line of text to show what the news release is about.

- Farm Grows Organic Vegetables & Herbs Using Hydroponics.

Summary: A concise body of text, generally a few sentences long, summarizing what the press release is about.

NY, New York – August 1st 2005 – Hydroponics is an advanced plant cultivation technique that grows plants bigger, healthier, and quicker than traditional soil applications because the plants will have constant access to required nutrients. Acme-Demo-Biz Inc. Co., will begin to produce their crops using this advanced cultivation technique along with organic fertilizer to grow high-quality, healthy produce.

Body: The body is a continuation of the summary portion of the press release. This is where you give in-depth details regarding your announcement.

Acme-Demo-Biz Inc’s VP, John Doe said “While it’s more difficult to grow crops using hydroponics, the technique allows plants to grow more vigorously, healthy and reach peak-maturity quicker than with traditional soil application. We also save money on fertilizer and water because hydroponics recycles the nutrient solution. This will allow us to pass that savings on to our customers as well as provide them with fresh, tasty vegetables and herbs.”

Hydroponics is an indoor cultivation technique. Acme-Demo-Biz Inc. plans on building three large-scale commercial greenhouse to produce vegetables like tomatoes, peppers, cilantro and basil. “To ensure a successful harvest, Acme-Demo-Biz Inc. will use computers to monitor the grow-room’s temperature and the nutrient solution pH and E.C levels – All of which needs to be controlled precisely, to avoid complications to the plants’ overall health and development.” Said Mr. Doe.

Construction of the three greenhouses will begin December 1, 2005. Acme-Demo-Biz Inc. hopes to have the construction completed within one year to start providing organically grown crops to high-end restaurants, health-food stores and produce markets.

For more information visit Acme-Demo-Biz Inc. Co., web site at http://acme-whatever.com, by email at acme@acme-whatever.com or call 1-800-555-5555.

About the author: Article Courtesy of HydroponicSearch.com - Agriculture Press Release Distribution Service .

The Ultimate PR "Scam"

Author: Robert A. Kelly

The Ultimate PR “Scam”

It happens to business, non-profit and association managers when their public relations budget fails to deliver the crucial external audience behaviors they need to achieve their department, division or subsidiary objectives.

Behaviors they should have received leading directly to boosts in repeat purchases; growing community support; more tech firms specifying the manager’s components; increased capital donations; stronger employee retention rates; new waves of prospects, or healthy membership increases.

If that rings your bell, you need to take two actions.

First, insist that your public relations activity is based on a fundamental premise like this: People act on their own perception of the facts before them, which leads to predictable behaviors about which something can be done. When we create, change or reinforce that opinion by reaching, persuading and moving-to-desired-action the very people whose behaviors affect the organization the most, the public relations mission is accomplished.

Second, as the manager for whom they labor, get personally involved with the professionals managing your PR effort. Tell those specialists that you must list, then prioritize those key external audiences whose behaviors effect your unit the most.

Identify that outside audience sitting at the top of your slate, and we’ll work on it right now.

Nothing happens, of course, until you gather some pithy information. Namely, how do members of that key target audience, whose behaviors affect your unit’s success or failure, actually perceive you?

You and/or your PR team must interact with members of that audience and monitor their perceptions by asking a number of questions: Do you know anything about us? What have you heard about our services or products? Have you ever had contact with our organization? Was it satisfactory?

The trick here is to stay vigilant for negative signs, in particular, untruths, exaggerations, inaccuracies, rumors or misconceptions.

By the time you complete this exercise, you will have gathered the raw material you need to establish a corrective public relations goal. It might aim to fix an inaccuracy, clear up a misconception or lay that rumor to rest.

How you get to that goal, however, is another question because you have just three strategy choices when it comes to perception/ opinion matters like this. Create perception/opinion where there isn’t any, reinforce existing opinion, or change it. A warning: insure that your new strategy is an obvious match for your new public relations goal.

Now, alert your team to a real writing challenge – a message tasked with altering the offending perception. Which means your writer must produce a message that changes what many target audience members now believe. No easy job!

It must be clear about how the current perception is out of kilter. And it must not only be truthful, but persuasive, compelling and believable if it is to lead ultimately to the desired behavior. True heavy lifting!

By the way, messages like that best retain their credibility when delivered along with another news announcement or presentation, rather than a dedicated, high-profile press release.

Speaking of delivery, it’s time for you and your PR team to select the communications tactics to carry that message of yours to members of a target audience that really needs to hear it. Fortunately, there are dozens of such tactics awaiting your pleasure – speeches, radio/newspaper interviews, brochures, op-eds, newsmaker events, newsletters and many, many more. Be careful that the tactics you use have a record of reaching folks just like those you’re aiming at.

It won’t be long before people around you begin asking about progress. Which, once again, will put your team back in the opinion monitoring mode out among the members of your target audience. And the questions they ask will be very similar to those used in the first perception monitoring session.

Difference this time around will be your close attention to just how much current perceptions are really undergoing the change for which you planned. You want solid signs that the offending perception is actually being altered.

You can always shovel more coal into the boiler by adding new communications tactics, then using them more frequently to achieve faster progress.

When you apply a comprehensive and workable plan like this, you have little to fear from “a PR scam.” Instead, you are on-track to achieve those key audience behaviors you must have to reach your unit’s operating objectives.

end

About the author: Bob Kelly counsels, writes and speaks to managers about using the fundamental premise of public relations to achieve their operating objectives. He has been DPR, Pepsi-Cola Co.; AGM-PR, Texaco Inc.; VP-PR, Olin Corp.; VP-PR, Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.; director of communications, U.S. Department of the Interior, and deputy assistant press secretary, The White House. mailto:bobkelly@TNI.net Visit:http://www.prcommentary.com

Thursday, February 23, 2006

Managers: Are You PR-Fit?

Author: Robert A. Kelly

Managers: Are You PR-Fit?

Can you honestly say that your business, non-profit or association’s key outside audiences behave in ways that help lead to your success on-the-job?

Or, have you pretty much ignored the reality that target audience behaviors can help or hinder you in achieving your department, division or subsidiary’s operating objectives?

Truth is, your unit’s public relations effort can never be truly fit until the primary focus of the PR people assigned to you is shifted from tactical concerns to a more comprehensive public relations action blueprint like this: people act on their own perception of the facts before them, which leads to predictable behaviors about which something can be done. When we create, change or reinforce that opinion by reaching, persuading and moving- to-desired-action the very people whose behaviors affect the organization the most, the public relations mission is accomplished.

What such a foundation gives you is the ability to help persuade those important external stakeholders to your way of thinking. Which can cause them to take actions that lead to your success as a manager.

Any idea how to make that happen?

First, tell your public relations team that you’re serious about nailing down what those outside audiences with the behaviors that affect your unit the most, really think about your organization. After you list the external stakeholders, prioritize them so we’re certain we’re working on one of your key target audiences.

Next, you and your PR team must interact with members of that audience by asking a number of questions aimed at finding out how you’re perceived. Look for inaccurate beliefs, troublesome misconceptions, potentially dangerous rumors, and any other negativities that might translate into target audience behaviors that could hurt you.

Of course, you could hire a professional survey firm to interact with members of your target audience and gather the perception data you need. But that can get expensive indicating, at least to me, that the alternative use of your own PR staff to handle this chore, is the better choice.

Question now, how to achieve that public relations goal? Obviously, you need the right strategy to show you how to do it. Luckily, where opinion/perception is concerned, there are really only three strategy choices: create perception/opinion where none exists, change existing perception, or reinforce it. And be certain the strategic choice you made clearly fits your new public relations goal.

Now, remember that the message you use to communicate your corrective message to members of your target audience is not only crucially important to the program’s success, but a real writing challenge for you and your public relations team. The message must be clearly written as to why the offending perception really needs to be clarified. Supporting facts must be above challenge and believable if your message is to be persuasive. And, it should be compelling.

Delivering your message, perhaps surprisingly, is not a complex assignment because you have a long list of communications tactics to help you do the job. They range from media interviews, emails, personal contacts and newsletters to facility tours, press releases, brochures, consumer meetings and many others. The only caution here is to check and double-check that those you choose are known to reach people like those who make up your target audience.

Sooner rather than later, you will need to determine how much progress you’re making in altering the damaging perception and its equally damaging follow-on behavior. This is also not a complex challenge.

Here, you and your public relations people must once again interact with members of your target audience and ask questions similar to those used in the earlier benchmark monitoring drill.

The big difference this time around? You’ll be alert to change. In other words, you want to see clear indications that the damaging perception is actually undergoing alteration in your direction.

You can always add more communications tactics, increase their frequencies and sharpen your message to move things along at a faster clip.

The result for you as a business, non-profit or association manager, will be a workable department, division or subsidiary public relations blueprint that succeeds in creating key outside audience behaviors that help lead you to success on-the-job.

end

About the author: Bob Kelly counsels, writes and speaks to managers about using the fundamental premise of public relations to achieve their operating objectives. He has been DPR, Pepsi-Cola Co.; AGM-PR, Texaco Inc.; VP-PR, Olin Corp.; VP-PR, Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.; director of communications, U.S. Department of the Interior, and deputy assistant press secretary, The White House. mailto:bobkelly@TNI.net Visit:http://www.prcommentary.com

Make Your PR Budget Work Harder

Author: Robert A. Kelly

Make Your PR Budget Work Harder

Do it by restructuring your business, non-profit or association public relations program so that it delivers the stakeholder behavior changes you want. Changes that lead directly to achieving your objectives.

A good first step is to base the restructure on a reality like this: People act on their own perception of the facts before them, which leads to predictable behaviors about which something can be done. When we create, change or reinforce that opinion by reaching, persuading and moving-to-desired -action the very people whose behaviors affect the organization the most, the public relations mission is accomplished.

Then, if you haven’t done so already, think about your important outside audiences and how their behaviors can help or hinder your organization. List them in order of damage severity, and let’s talk about #1 on the roster.

Obviously, before you decide how to deal with external audience perceptions and, thus, behaviors, it makes sense to find out what members of that target audience really think about your organization.

If you are not equipped with a budget to pay for professional survey work, you and your colleagues,have little choice but to interact with audience members and that means using penetrating questions – “What do you think of us? How much do you know about us? Have you ever had contact with our people? If so, was it a positive experience?” Stay alert to negativities, and watch closely for inaccuracies, misconceptions, and exaggerations.

The data you gather from such monitoring activity let’s you identify the most severe perception problem, then establish it as your corrective public relations goal. Which allows you to straighten out that misconception, correct that inaccuracy or deflate that exaggeration.

Your goal isn’t worth much by itself. It needs a buddy, and that buddy is a strategy that shows you what you must do to achieve the goal. Luckily, there are only three strategies to choose from when it comes to perceptions and opinions. Reinforce existing opinion, change it, or create perception where none exists. Here, by the way, you must take care that your chosen strategy fits naturally with your new goal.

Writing the message – especially one burdened with the job of altering perception – is never an easy job. In other words, it must change the opinion of a key target audience and that can be a challenging writing assignment.

All at the same time, the message must be persuasive and compelling. And to do that, it must be clear about what is to be altered and why. It must be truthful, of course, and believable if it is to move target audience perception towards your view. On occasion, you may wish to avoid the showcase effect of a separate news release leading you to either piggyback your message on another operating announcement, or deliver it live at one of your newsmaker special events or media interviews.

Since the message will do very little simply looking back at you from the word processor, you must round up your “beasts of burden” to carry your message to the right eyes and ears among your target audience. These are communications tactics and there are scores of them ready to help. They range from emails, speeches, and press releases to radio/newspaper interviews, newsletters, facility tours and many more. Only caution here is, make certain any communications tactics you use come with proof that they reaches folks similar to those in your target audience.

Questions will soon be raised as to whether your public relations effort is succeeding. Which will send you and your colleagues back into the field to question your target audience members once again.

Only this time, you’re on the lookout for change in the form of perceptions altered, and opinions modified in your direction, as you planned.

It’s also comforting to know that a lagging effort can be accelerated, and its impact increased, by adding more communications tactics to the mix. Further, their frequencies can be bumped up as well.

All of which increases the chances you will succeed in changing the behaviors of your key external audiences. Behavior change that you want and need, and that leads directly to achieving your primary operating objectives.

end

About the author: Bob Kelly counsels, writes and speaks about using the fundamental premise of public relations to achieve their operating objectives. He has been DPR, Pepsi-Cola Co.; AGM-PR, Texaco Inc.; VP-PR, Olin Corp.; VP-PR, Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.; director of communications, U.S. Department of the Interior, and deputy assistant press secretary, The White House. mailto:bobkelly@TNI.net Visit:http://www.prcommentary.com